Whips to walls watterson rodney k. Whips to Walls, Rodney K Watterson 2019-03-05

Whips to walls watterson rodney k Rating: 5,9/10 379 reviews

Whips to Walls : Rodney K. Watterson : 9781612514451

whips to walls watterson rodney k

Sims and others became convinced that too many troublemakers were being returned to the fleet. During his naval career, Captain Rodney K. Serious military offenders are now largely confined at Fort Leavenworth, where they are treated in a more humane environment and with more compassion. Now through meticulous research in little-used sources, Rod Watterson has reconstructed the evolution of the U. This is military cultural history at its finest--detailed, lively, and surprising.

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Whips to Walls by Rodney K. Watterson (ebook)

whips to walls watterson rodney k

When congress abolished flogging in 1850, the Navy was left with few punishment options. A naval prison system was needed to consolidate and provide for consistent treatment of prisoners. Casual readers of maritime history might be reluctant to pick up a book entitled Whips to Walls that features a photo of a grim castle-like prison on its cover. During World War I, that prison became the center of the Navy s attempt to reform what many considered outdated means of punishment. Thankfully, Rod Watterson's new book not only kills old rumors about the mysterious naval prison, but also adds a critical new chapter to the 400-year maritime history of Portsmouth Harbor. At this point Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Delano Roosevelt chose the most celebrated prison reformer of his era, Thomas Mott Osborne, to assume command of the Portsmouth prison.

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Whips to Walls, Rodney K Watterson

whips to walls watterson rodney k

At the same time, courts-martial prisoners were sporadically confined in various marine barracks, navy yard jails, naval station guard houses, prison ships and state prisons. An investigation of conditions at Portsmouth prison resulted in charges of gross mismanagement and rampant homosexual activity. Osborne's reform initiatives were quickly reversed as the Navy returned to a harsher punishment system. Watterson Adult content: No Language: English Has Image Descriptions: No Categories: , , Submitted By: Bookshare Staff Usage Restrictions: This is a copyrighted book. The Navy's discipline system was in disarray. Now through meticulous research in little-used sources, Rod Watterson has reconstructed the evolution of the U.

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Whips to Walls: Naval Discipline from Flogging to Progressive Era Reform at Port

whips to walls watterson rodney k

Driven by Progressive Era ideals and led by Thomas Mott Osborne, cell doors remained opened, inmates governed themselves, and thousands of rehabilitated prisoners were returned to the fleet. Navy on a quest for a prison system that culminated with the opening of Portsmouth Naval Prison in 1908. About the Author Captain Rodney K. Old time methods of punishment have passed away, never to return. This humanitarian experiment at Portsmouth prison stood in stark contrast to the inhumane flogging of prisoners that had dominated naval discipline until 1850. Making excellent use of charts to illustrate historical trends and personal testimonies and anecdotes to round out the narrative, Watterson has written a compelling account of a most curious era of naval history. Flogging had been a harsh, but very effective and efficient discipline tool.

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8 Bells Lecture

whips to walls watterson rodney k

Subsequent naval directives that merely suggested punishments for various offenses led to inconsistent interpretation and application of punishments throughout the fleet. In the late 1880s, the Navy took matters into its own hands and established a prison system centred on makeshift prisons at the Boston and Mare Island Navy Yards. Flogging had been a harsh, but very effective and efficient discipline tool. A consolidation of naval prisons in 1914 left Portsmouth as the dominant centerpiece of the naval prison system. Morris Prize for maritime historiography.

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Whips to Walls: Naval Discipline from Flogging to Progressive Era Reform at Portsmouth Prison by Rodney K. Watterson at Abbey's Bookshop

whips to walls watterson rodney k

Sims and others became convinced that too many trouble makers were being returned to the fleet. Various conditions of confinement appeared to be the most logical substitute for flogging, but the Navy had few cells ashore and confinement onboard a nineteenth century man-of-war sailing vessel was impractical. Searches cannot start with a wildcard. It wasn't, but a good myth dies hard. The story behind the Castle is as silent and unknown today as the story of naval discipline since the abandonment of the lash.

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Whips to Walls

whips to walls watterson rodney k

The answers are all here, and in the answering is a tale you'll not soon forget. The author has thoroughly researched and clearly documented the Navy's journey between these two extremes in naval discipline. At this point Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin Delano Roosevelt chose the most celebrated prison reformer of his era, Thomas Mott Osborne, to assume command of the Portsmouth prison. Sims and others became convinced that too many troublemakers were being returned to the fleet. Subsequent naval directives that merely suggested punishments for various offenses led to inconsistent interpretation and application of punishments throughout the fleet. Some had great difficulty performing dangerous duties upon a rolling sea.

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Bio

whips to walls watterson rodney k

At ThriftBooks, our motto is: Read More, Spend Less. The spine may show signs of wear. The book has graphs and charts concerning the navy and its prisoners, many of which are hard to follow and are confusing. This had two advantages: those receiving the lash could show their courage by taking the punishment in a manly fashion and were able to recover in a relatively short time and remain available to perform his shipboard duties. A naval prison system was needed to consolidate and provide for consistent treatment of prisoners. The book examines the men who were early naval recruits as well as what measures were used to establish and maintain shipboard discipline and its evolution in the face of moral and political pressures.

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