Fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e. CiNii Books 2019-02-26

Fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e Rating: 6,8/10 1828 reviews

Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts: another sneak preview

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

In a new Introduction, Guy explains that her interest in gender history grew out of her work in labor history and that her research methods are firmly grounded in the fields of legal history and political economy. Moss has helpfully provided two indices - a brief description of the families whose le For a slim volume, this book has a lot to say! By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. In this extract, we see something of the relationship between the merchant Richard Cely and his son George, who was at this point a young man in his early 20s, and was managing family business in Calais and Bruges while his father was in London. Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts. The short collection unites for the first time Donna Guy's published essays on such topics as women's labor in northwestern Argentina, social reformers Emilio and Gabriela Coni, and the relationships among feminists, social workers and pediatricians in the hemisphere-wide child rights movement.

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Description: Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts.

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

The E-mail message field is required. Gender attitudes within marriage are discussed in Chapter 3, in which the later medieval authors are shown to adopt clerical models of marriage; priority is given to the role of the spouse over an aristocratic concern with procreation, and the wife is exemplified as a moral role model for her husband. In response to recent criticisms that have sought to challenge the image of late medieval literature as coming from 'a period of ineluctable decline' p. Late medieval English society placed great weight on the practices of primogeniture, patrilineal descent, and patriarchal government, and the significance of the father had cultural resonance beyond the rule of law. Dr Rachel Moss is Lecturer in Medieval History, Faculty of History, University of Oxford. Guy's work regarding gender, labor and health in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Argentina appears in the second half of the volume. The strength of paternal affection could become particularly clear in a crisis.

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Fatherhood and Its Representations in Middle English Texts by Rachel E. Moss

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

Related to these issues are the proprieties of affection and reciprocities between fathers and sons, and the responsibilities of each to each. The first chapter considers literacy among families, the creation of reading groups, and the relationship between these new vernacular affiliations, patrons, and the compiling of codices, to determine, in part, at least, who might have been acquainted with popular romances. This book's close engagement with romance, gender, and broader social discourses should make it a valuable contribution to both medieval gender studies and current research into the culture of the later Middle Ages. This essay considers the influence that gender studies has and can have on thinking about violence, nonviolence, war and peace, and conflict transformation. Suppositions in the theories of gender mesh well with the normative approach of peace and conflict studies. In this way the portrayal of gender interaction is seen to provide both positive and negative examples of relationships with the opposite sex, transforming the individualistic passions of earlier romance narratives into models of conduct that promote harmony between personal affiliations and social duties.

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Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

The Middle English texts that she explores for their representations of fatherhood are of two kinds: letter collections, specifically those of the Pastons, Celys and Stonors; and those metrical romances in which parenthood is in some way an issue. Fathers and Daughters -- 5. The destructive potential of misdirected male sexuality, whether in adulterous, bigamous, or incestuous relationships as explored in Chapter 4 , is closely connected with transgression on a wider social scale: rulers who fail to conform to the moral example of their spouses are portrayed as tyrannical and irresponsible, the family being conceptualized as a microcosm of the wider body politic. Also, there are no footnotes or endnotes in the collection. Moss The English Historical Review Oxford Academic Notwithstanding the rapid increase in studies of masculinity, the dynamics of paternal relationships, as Rachel Moss notes, have been largely ignored, and she has interesting things to say about their various workings in such issues as the transition to full manhood implied by fatherhood, father—son relationships, stepfathers, and illegitimacy.

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CiNii Books

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

Dr Rachel Moss is Lecturer in Medieval History, Faculty of History, University of Oxford. Because all of the essays in White Slavery and Mothers Alive and Dead has appeared previously in diverse venues, some information is repeated. An epidemic was afoot, which naturally enough spread from England to the mercantile colonies of Calais, Bruges and Antwerp. Subjects: Description Summary: Late medieval English society placed great weight on the practices of primogeniture, patrilineal descent, and patriarchal government, and the significance of the father had cultural resonance beyond the rule of law. Will Maryon, writing to George a couple of days later, corroborated this, saying: My master yowre fader and my maysterys yowre modere hat ben ryght heuy for yow.

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Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts by Rachel E. Moss

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

This new volume provides the specialist and non-specialist, alike, with an engaging introduction to the way the sub-field of gender history has developed over the past two decades. This demonstrates that both George and Richard were grieving for their father, and reinforces the already strong sense in the letters that the two brothers were a support for one another. For example, the articles on feminism, higienismo, and Pan Americanism appeared in such publications as the Journal of Family History and Gender and History. Dr Rachel Moss is Lecturer in Medieval History, Faculty of History, University of Oxford. Through close examination of late medieval letters and romances, It shows how the father was the dominant figure not only of medieval domestic life, but also of the medieval imagination. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Fathers and Sons -- 4.

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Description: Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts.

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

This book takes an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of the -fictions- of fatherhood, the ideological constructs that underpinned late medieval conceptions of fathers and patriarchy. Through close examination of late medieval letters and romances, it shows how the father was the dominant figure not only of medieval domestic life, but also of the medieval imagination. In terms of methodology, Brown-Grant effects a diachronic contextualization relating the narratives both to their earlier medieval counterparts, and to moral and political discourses of the later Middle Ages. But in many ways the most informative discussion in this chapter deals with sons in search of missing fathers, exemplified in fiction by Sir Degaré and Lybeaus Desconus, tied in with discussion of sons and heirs in the Celey and Paston letters, where the relationship between fathers and sons ought to be simple, but seldom is, though it is clear that they need each other, at least legally. Richard senior seems to have been the kind of man who fretted, and the mercantile trade had inherent risks for his sons. This is seen to be in conflict with earlier medieval portrayals, which sympathetically adhere to the 'cult of youth'. Moss has helpfully provided two indices - a brief description of the families whose letters are used in the book, and another that gives summaries of the medieval romances.

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Fatherhood and its Representations in Middle English Texts by Rachel E. Moss

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

This close historicization reveals not only ideological developments in relation to the corpus's literary predecessors, but also a close connection between romance and contemporary didactic moral attitudes. We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. The letters thus turn from telling us what was happening in fifteenth-century households,. Yet despite a burgeoning interest in both the family and gender, -the father- has to date received little attention from medievalists. For instance, he wrote to Richard junior anxiously telling him not to cross the Channel if the weather was bad, and relayed the same information to George a week later.

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CiNii Books

fatherhood and its representations in middle english texts moss rachel e

This last was especially helpful, as I was not very familiar with many of the texts the failing of studying English literature is that one never has enough time to look at everything. Chapter 1 demonstrates an ideological continuity between later medieval chivalric romances and contemporaneous non-fictional chivalric treatises, both of which reject earlier forms of love service as a spur to achievement, in favour of adventures that educate the knight for his future social responsibilities. Its focus on gentry and mercantile readers and writers also offers new insights into the literary culture of late medieval England by considering how texts were produced and received within gentry and bourgeois communities, and demonstrates the ability of texts to not only reflect but also shape hegemonic norms and cultural anxieties. For a slim volume, this book has a lot to say! But his love and concern for George are never more palpable than in letters both from himself and by other family members in November and December 1479. Nevertheless, readers without access to these earlier editions may find this omission frustrating.

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